Friday, January 22, 2010

Part of the Disney Family?

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As most of you know, I have done quite a bit of work over the past 2 years on “One Life to Live” (and show owned by Disney, which is the parent company of ABC.) I’ll get booked to work one-day stints on set, and then receiving a paycheck 2 weeks later, along with a residual check about 4 weeks after that when the episode airs on “SoapNet.” I have had the same relationship with Proctor & Gamble (parent company of CBS) after all of my work on “Guiding Light.”

So it was odd when I found a large (but thin) envelope from Disney in my mailbox the other day:
It was a brochure for their Employee Assistance Program which (those of you who have worked in corporate America know) is a program that pays for emotional counseling and ”personal life resources“ for all employees. Companies do this because they value the mental health of their employees, and feel it’s a good way to protect their investment of time and money for each person they hire.

Funny- I never really thought of myself as an employee of Disney, though I certainly get W2s at the end of the year. So, I find it amusing that, of all the things Disney could send me, a document regarding my mental health is my official introduction to the Disney family.

Though, if you think about it, the fact that I get W2s each year from one of the biggest companies in the world but still live paycheck to paycheck MIGHT make me a mental case at some point. Maybe we should applaud their foresight...

Oh and PS: I just booked ANOTHER day on "One Life to Live" - this time as a social worker. I'll be picking up my script next week, but in the meantime I am fantasizing about who I will be counseling... =)


Erin Cronican's career as a professional actor and career coach has spanned the last 25 years in New York City, Los Angeles and San Diego. She has appeared in major feature films and on television, and has toured nationally with plays and musicals. She has worked in the advertising & marketing departments of major corporations, film production companies, theater magazines, and non-profit acting organizations. For more information, please visit http://www.erincronican.com.

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Kate Turns the Tables

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I finally got around to watching “Revolutionary Road.” Man, Kate Winslet was amazing in that film. Actually, I liked everyone in the film, especially Michael Shannon as the disturbed houseguest, John Givings. But what amazed me is how unafraid Kate is of looking “normal” and “her age” in the film. She is beautiful to watch, both visually and emotionally, and her performance packed a punch. As always, I eagerly anticipated the special features on the DVD, which would allow me to get a sneak peak into the construct of the film. In part of the features, there was a wonderful interview with Kate where she talked about working with her husband as a director for the first time, encouraging “Leo” to play the role of her husband, and shared her perspectives on the characters. While I was watching this, something profound occurred to me: looking natural and “normal” on-screen is a brilliant move for a woman in her 20s & 30s.

Think of it this way: most of us are terrified that if we appear old on-camera, it will limit our ability to play roles our own age (or younger) in the future. Female actors strive to look as young as possible to compete, and work hard to live up to the perfect image that gets portrayed on the screen. We compete against the professional makeup, camera filters and fancy lighting, which will always beat out natural light, “street“ makeup and the naked eye in observation.

But if you watch what Kate does: Kate always appears fabulous off-screen because she she doesn’t pretend to be perfect on-screen. It’s kind of brilliant (and I say that tongue in cheek, because I think it kicks ass.) As evidence, take a look at this set of photos:

Kate on-screen in her last 2 big films:


Kate off-screen, likely at an industry event:


WHOA! You end up saying to yourself, “Wow- Kate looks amazing!” With many other female actors off-screen, the context of the photos would be flipped. People will think, “Well, she looked great in that movie, but in real life she’s looking old,“ or, ”Wow, she looks like she’s gained weight.“ Kate has pretty much guaranteed that she will look more sleek, more polished, more radiant... just stunning... because she doesn’t have to live up to some kind of unrealistic perfection. Other examples: Charlize Theron in ”Monster.“ America Ferrera on ”Ugly Betty“ - I wish the list could go on and on, but there aren’t many people who are confident enough to break down these barriers.

I found myself really inspired by this realization. It should be noted that the main way Kate gets away with this is that she is captivating to watch, and give a performance of a lifetime each time she takes on a role. The beauty of this realization (pun intended): Because of my ”light bulb“/”ah-ha“ moment, I am no longer afraid of how I might look on screen. What really matters is the quality of the work, and someone who presents themselves as joyful and fearless in everything they do. THAT is the real reason people think Kate, and Charlize and America are beautiful. Their work can do the speaking for them, and they just have to show up in a pretty dress.

Who wants to commit to joining the ranks and further break down these barriers? =)


Erin Cronican's career as a professional actor and career coach has spanned the last 25 years in New York City, Los Angeles and San Diego. She has appeared in major feature films and on television, and has toured nationally with plays and musicals. She has worked in the advertising & marketing departments of major corporations, film production companies, theater magazines, and non-profit acting organizations. For more information, please visit http://www.erincronican.com.

Thursday, January 7, 2010

THAT'S a skill I have!

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I was going through a set of audition notices, and one came up that almost made me do a spit take:

[KRISHNA GIRL] Female (20-30) All ethnicities. Hippie chick. Tambourine skills required. 1 line.

I want to know who CAN’T play the tambourine. Is this really a problem?


Erin Cronican's career as a professional actor and career coach has spanned the last 25 years in New York City, Los Angeles and San Diego. She has appeared in major feature films and on television, and has toured nationally with plays and musicals. She has worked in the advertising & marketing departments of major corporations, film production companies, theater magazines, and non-profit acting organizations. For more information, please visit http://www.erincronican.com.


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